Photo of Brian Cohen

Brian Cohen is a founding partner of the firm. An accomplished litigator practicing in federal and state courts throughout the country, he has extensive experience in all phases of litigation. Brian has successfully represented a diverse clientele in a broad range of complex business and real estate litigation and class action litigation. Brian is a 1997 graduate of the St. John's University School of Law, where he was a member of the St. John's Law Review.

Brian is admitted to practice law in New York, Connecticut, the United States Supreme Court, United States Courts of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the United States District Courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York and the District of Connecticut. He is a member of the Westchester County Bar Association and its Corporate and Commercial Law Committee.

We’ve previously written about how judges in the Westchester Commercial Division will dismiss cases in which the contract at issue contains a forum selection clause requiring the parties to resolve their dispute elsewhere. On September 10, 2019, Justice Linda Jamieson issued another decision doing just that.

Satin v. 1-800 NY Bulbs Limited, Index No.

In real estate agency relationships, an agent owes its client, a buyer or seller of property, fiduciary duties, including duties of undivided loyalty, reasonable care, and confidentiality. Due to the increasing number of large brokerage firms, “dual agency” deals have become commonplace. A dual agency occurs when an agent represents the buyer and the seller

New York’s Commercial Division is an attractive forum for parties to litigate disputes over financial transactions. And, because so many transactions flow through New York institutions, aggrieved plaintiffs often believe that the flow of money through the state gives them a hook to sue defendants in New York courts. Often, that is true. But there

On June 14, 2019, the New York State Bar Association hosted a breakfast at the Westchester County Courthouse with Justices Linda Jamieson and Gretchen Walsh. This was a great opportunity to hear from Westchester’s Commercial Division judges on various topics, including their expectations of attorneys who appear before them. Here are a handful of important

A recent decision from Westchester Commercial Division Justice Linda Jamieson addressed two issues that arise in commercial landlord-tenant relationships: (i) whether a landlord can pierce the corporate veil to hold a tenant’s corporate representative liable under leases; and (ii) the timeliness of claims for past due rent.

Piercing the Corporate Veil

In Hoffman Investors Corp.,